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Low Unemployment? For Some, Not For Others

Here me out, I am not in left field with this post.  There is a cable news contributor (I think his name is Jason) who defends any criticism of the President by condescendingly expressing the same information each time.  He is always defending the President by among other things pointing out the fact that Trump is solely responsible for the improving employment picture in this country.  Every time he says it I roll my eyes and wish I was on the show to point out that he, as well as many other republicans are not conveying the whole picture to the public.

The unemployment rate in this country statistically, as reported by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics is currently at 4.1% (October 2017).

This figure reflects an increase in non-farm employment of 261,000 jobs.  That is actually pretty good.

The problem as I see it is that this single statistic does not reflect the whole employment/unemployment situation in our country.  If you look at unemployment by race and gender you can see that there is some inequity in the breakdown.  For instance the unemployment rate among African Americans is 7.5%.  The unemployment rate among the Hispanic population is 5.1%.  The unemployment rate within the Asian community is currently 3.8%.  Not surprisingly, the unemployment rate for women is 5.7%.  These statistics reflect unemployment totals for workers over 16.

My point is that the current Administration is very proud of their accomplishment relative to jobs.  The truth is that it appears that the President is doing very little to improve and increase employment opportunities for Blacks, Hispanics and women.  The positive unemployment statistics are not identifying areas where unemployment is much higher.

You can massage any statistic to reflect the result you want.  With labor, you start with an overwhelming number, not percentage, of White/European workers.  When you include the groups with much lower totals of people and higher unemployment, the smaller population’s numbers become diluted and don’t have a significant impact on the total.

Also, any legitimate graph will demonstrate that the decrease in umployment actually started to trend positive after the fincancial crisis and during the Obama administration.

I think another point is that even with the improvement in the economy (a whole different issue) and the marginal growth of the GDP, lower and middle class incomes have been static.

As a government, politically, I don’t think republicans should blame Obama for everything negative, conversely, democrats shouldn’t blame President Trump for everything that is wrong in this world.  Even though I have strong views on the issues related to one side over the other, I think it is important to be thankful for the accomplishments of both.

If it is of interest to you, I have included a couple of links from the BLS that offer more specific detail.

 

BLS A-16 Report Unemployment By Demographics

BLS A=15 Report by Household

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scotsplanet.com

I enjoy following and sharing my opinions on the social and political events of the day. I also have an interest in statistics, the environment and noteworthy people in general.

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